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"Every block of stone has a statue inside it, and it is the task of the
sculptor to discover it."    
Michelangelo





 calliope wellness magazine

                                   

 


List of Articles

  1.  Benefits of goat milk vs. cow milk

  2.  Following "Fat Busters"  GARCINIA CAMBOGIA; updates on natural supplements that help increase weight loss by Rhonda Carol 

  3. The Cave Man Diet; Assessing the Low Carb/Paleolithic Diet: Fitness Design Expert Rhonda Carol explores various sources - RECIPES INCLUDED

  4. GOT MILK?  Dairy: 6 Reasons You Should Avoid It All Costs or Why Following the USDA Food Pyramid Guidelines is Bad for Your Health by Mark Hyman, MD, Huffington Post

  5. The Eyes Don't Have It - Nine Essential Shoe Tips for Men and Women For 2014, by Cathy Berger, Fashion Societe
  
  6.  Building a Strong Core: To Crunch or Not To Crunch, by Rhonda Carol

  7.  The Healing Benefits of Drumming by Jane Elliot, BBC


1. benefits of goat milk vs. cow milk                                                

by Dr. Thomas Cooke

 

Free range goats

Happy free range goats.

“Milk, it does a body good.” This was the marketing mantra employed by the cow industry in the 1980’s to boost interest in cow’s milk. The campaign was wildly successful and as a result, The Dairy Farmers of America have reported sales topping 11 billion dollars in 2007. But does the overwhelming popularity of cow’s milk in the United States signify that it really is the best? Should we assume that quantity equates quality when referring to a substance that is such an integral part of our food supply? Interestingly enough, when worldwide consumption of milk is taken into account, it is not cow’s milk that is most popular but goat’s milk.

In fact 65% of the milk consumption worldwide is from goat’s milk, and this popularity hasn’t come about due to high profile marketing campaigns or big-budget advertisements.

The reasons for the worldwide popularity of goat’s milk are multifaceted. First, we need to remind ourselves that “All milk is not created equal.” The differences between cow’s milk and goat’s milk may not seem apparent upon first examination. A closer look, however, reveals several key factors that play an integral part in how milk (from either cows or goats) matches up with the human body in its various stages. All humans have been created to be sustained entirely upon mothers’ milk for at least the first six months of life. There is no other food in the world better than mothers’ milk, and it truly shows both in the laboratory and the real world. But what about after these first few months are over, and one is faced with the rest of life? Why would someone choose goat’s milk products over the far more popular and accessible cow’s milk?

Here are 5 reasons goat milk is better than cow milk.

1. Goat’s milk is less allergenic.

2. Goat’s milk is naturally homogenized.

3. Goat’s milk is easier to digest.

4. Goat’s milk rarely causes lactose intolerance.

5. Goat’s milk matches up to the human body better than cow’s milk.

1. Goat milk is less allergenic.

In the United State the most common food allergy for children under three is cow’s milk. Mild side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and skin rashes and severe effects can be as serious as anaphylactic shock! Needless to say it is a serious condition. The allergic reaction can be blamed on a protein allergen known as Alpha s1 Casein found in high levels in cow’s milk. The levels of Alpha s1 Casein in goat’s milk are about 89% less than cow’s milk providing a far less allergenic food.  In fact a recent study of infants allergic to cow’s milk found that nearly 93% could drink goat’s milk with virtually no side effects!1

2. Goat’s milk is naturally homogenized.

If you were to place both a glass of fresh cow’s milk as well as fresh goat’s milk in the refrigerator overnight, the next morning you would find that while the goat’s milk looks exactly the same, the cow’s milk has separated into two distinct ‘phases’ of cream on the top and skim milk on the bottom. This is a natural separation process that is caused by a compound called agglutinin and it will always cause the cow’s milk to separate. As Americans, we like everything neat and tidy and so to get the milk to the consumer in a uniform manner, the dairy industry utilizes a process called homogenization. This method works by forcing the fluid milk through a tiny hole under tremendous pressure which destroys the fat globule cell wall and allows the milk and cream to stay homogeneous or suspended and well mixed.

The problem with such homogenization is that once the cell wall of the fat globule has been broken, it releases a superoxide (free radical) known as Xanthine Oxidase. (see picture) Now free radicals cause a host of problems in the body not the least of which is DNA mutations which often lead to cancer! Thus, the benefit of natural homogenization comes into clear view. Goat’s milk has smaller fat globules and does not contain agglutinin which allows it to stay naturally homogenized thus eliminating the dangers associated with homogenization.

3. Goat’s milk is easier to digest.
Goat’s milk has smaller fat globules as well as higher levels of medium chain fatty acids. This means that during digestion, each fat globule and individual fatty acid will have a larger surface-to-volume ratio resulting in a quicker and easier digestion process. Also, when the proteins found in milk denature (clump up) in the stomach, they form a much softer bolus (curd) than cow’s milk. This allows the body to digest the protein more smoothly and completely than when digesting cow’s milk.

4. Goat’s milk rarely causes lactose intolerance.

 

All milk contains certain levels of lactose which is also known as ‘milk sugar.’ A relatively large portion of the population suffers from a deficiency (not an absence) of an enzyme known as lactase which is used to, you guessed it, digest lactose. This deficiency results in a condition known as lactose intolerance which is a fairly common ailment. (Lactose intolerance and cow’s milk allergy (cma) are two distinct conditions. CMA is due to a protein allergen, while lactose intolerance is due to a carbohydrate sensitivity.)

Goat’s milk contains less lactose than cow’s milk and therefore is easier to digest for those suffering from lactose intolerance. Now the interesting aspect to consider is that goat’s milk isn’t much lower than cow’s milk (contains about 10% less than cow’s milk) and yet, countless lactose intolerant patients are able to thrive on goat’s milk. Although the answer for this is unclear, it has been hypothesized that since goat’s milk is digested and absorbed in a superior manner, there is no “leftover” lactose that remains undigested which causes the painful and uncomfortable effects of lactose intolerance.

5. Goat’s milk matches up to the human body better than cow’s milk.

 

This matter is both an issue of biochemistry as well as thermodynamics. Regarding the biochemistry of the issue, we know that goat’s milk has a greater amount of essential fatty acids such as linoleic and arachidonic acid than cow’s milk as well as significantly greater amounts of vitamin B-6, vitamin A, and niacin. Goat’s milk is also a far superior source of the vitally important nutrient potassium which we discussed in a previous High Road to Health issue. This extensive amount of potassium causes goat’s milk to react in an alkaline way within the body whereas cow’s milk is lacking in potassium and ends up reacting in an acidic way.

Thermodynamically speaking, goat’s milk is better for human consumption. A baby usually starts life at around 7-9 pounds, a baby goat (kid) usually starts life at around 7-9 pounds, and a baby cow (calf) usually starts life at around 100 pounds. Now speaking from a purely thermodynamic position, these two animals have very significant and different nutritional needs for both maintenance and growth requirements. Cow’s milk is designed to take a 100 pound calf and transform it into a 1200 pound cow. Goat’s milk and human milk were both designed and created for transforming a 7-9 pound baby/kid into an average adult/goat of anywhere between 100-200 pounds. This significant discrepancy, along with many others, is manifesting on a national level as obesity rates sky rocket in the U.S.

To conclude, we have seen that goat’s milk has several attributes that cause it to be a far superior choice to cow’s milk. Goat’s milk is less allergenic, naturally homogenized, easier to digest, lactose intolerant friendly, and biochemically/thermodynamically superior to cow’s milk. As if these benefits were not enough, Mt. Capra’s goat’s milk products do not contain any growth hormones or antibiotics that massive cow dairies have come to rely upon to turn a profit! So to sum up and paraphrase the cow industry catchphrase: “Goat Milk: It Does a Body Good.

Thomas R. Cooke, Doctor of Osteopathy; Graduated in 1976 from Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine. For over thirty years Dr Cooke has been caring for patients in a culture of holistic treatment, practicing a preventative illness approach, while teaching and encouraging patients the importance of wellness care

www.mtcapra.com

2.  FOLLOWING "FAT BUSTERS" - GARCINIA CAMBOGIA - UPDATE ON NATURAL SUPPLEMENTS FOR WEIGHT LOSS  

by Rhonda Carol

Garcinia Cambogia is a plant extract (HCA) from the Tamarind fruit commonly grown in South East Asia and India and helpful in increasing weight loss, inhibiting fat production in the body and promoting other health benefits.  Recently brought to the attention of the public on the Dr. Oz Show as a possible "Fat Buster" the plant extract is gaining popularity as a weight loss tool.  It also helps appetite control by increasing serotonin (derived from Tryptophan), helps increase lean muscle tissue and is know to be helpful in medicine for diabetes.  The average monthly weight loss to be expected is about 4 lbs./mo., which can be safe and reasonable.  An exercise program and healthy eating regimen should be included for maximum results.  Check with your doctor for possible interactions if you are taking any prescription medications or diabetic medications.  Not for use if pregnant.  Some sources recommend usage for no more than 12 weeks.    

What to look for on the label: 

Garcinia Cambogia or GCE (Garcinia Cambogia Extract)
50 - 60% HCA (Active Ingredient, Hydroxycitric Acid)
Potassium (for absorption)
500-1000 mg prior to each meal, (take at least 1/2 - 1 hour before eating) (1,500 mg per day recommended, no more than 3,000 mg daily)
Choose  a brand with natural ingredients without fillers

Sources: Consumer Review, Mercola.com, Dr. Julie Chen: Huffinton Post and droz.com


3. the caveman diet (assessing the low carb/paleolithic diet)               

WebMD

By Kathleen M. Zelman, MPH, RD, LD
 

Nutrition science continues to reveal new findings -- almost daily -- about healthy eating. But some experts say all we need to do is eat like our Stone Age ancestors to be healthy.

The Caveman Diet, also called the Paleolithic (or Paleo), Stone Age, and Warrior diets, is a plan based on eating plants and wild animals similar to what cavemen are presumed to have eaten around 10,000 years ago.

Why turn back the hands of time and eat that way? The premise is that our bodies are genetically programmed to eat like our Paleolithic ancestors.

Proponents claim it's the biologically appropriate diet that suits us best, with the proper balance of nutrients to promote health and reduce the incidence of chronic diseases.

Paleo (Caveman) Diet: What Supporters Say

The Paleo diet is a very healthy diet, says Loren Cordain, PhD, Colorado State University professor and author of The Paleo Diet.

“Clinical trials have shown that the Paleo Diet is the optimum diet that can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, blood pressure, markers of inflammation, help with weight loss, reduce acne, promote optimum health and athletic performance," Cordain says.  Supporters of this nutritional approach have published papers and books, and created web sites, to promote it. They argue that today's typical Western diet is responsible for the epidemic levels of obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and more.  The Paleo or Caveman diet is not without controversy. Some nutrition experts assert that humans have adapted to a broader diet including whole grains, dairy, and legumes. Others question the evidence for the diet’s evolutionary logic.  And even though grains and dairy seem healthful, Cordain says our "genome has not really adapted to these foods, which can cause inflammation at the cellular level and promote disease.”

The Caveman Diet: What You Can Eat

The diet is based on the foods that could be hunted, fished, and gathered during the Paleolithic era -- meat, fish, shellfish, eggs, tree nuts, vegetables, roots, fruits, and berries. 
But a true paleolithic diet is impossible to mimic because wild game is not readily available, most modern plant food is cultivated rather than wild, and meats are domesticated. At best, you can eat a modified version of the original diet that's gluten-free and includes lean meat, organ meats, fish, poultry, eggs, vegetables, fruit, and nuts. It's a wide variety of foods.  You won’t find any dairy, grains, sugar, legumes, potatoes, processed oils, and any foods that were grown after agriculture started.  On this diet, you'd skip salt and any drinks other than water, coconut water, or organic
green tea.

You can satisfy your sweet tooth with raw honey or coconut palm sugar, but only in limited quantities.

Some versions of the plan encourage fasting, eating raw foods, and eliminating nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, eggplant).

Some plans allow a little flexibility, like adding some processed oils from fruits and nuts, such as olive and flaxseed oil.  Supporters suggest eating organic plant foods, wild-caught fish, and grass-fed meats because they're closer to the nutritional quality of the foods of our ancestors.

1. From the Athletes point of view:

 "Athletes find success with paleo diets. 
  Men's Health Magazine"

Paleo guru Mark Sisson, former Ironman triathlete and author used to think that it wasn't possible to be a world-class endurance athlete on a paleo diet – that you just couldn't overcome the need for copious amounts of glucose in the form of carbohydrates without crashing and burning.

"The assumption has always been that glucose was the preferred fuel with regard to performance," Sisson says. "I used to joke back in my days of sugar burning that, ideally, you would hang an IV bag off the back of your bike and just drip glucose into your bloodstream the whole way."

But Sisson has changed his mind. He says that one of the problems with the few studies conducted on low-carb performance to date is that they were done on athletes who had not yet fully adapted to burning fat as a primary source of fuel, a process that can take weeks, if not months. These flawed studies made paleo a tough sell. "This is a leap of faith that a lot of athletes are unwilling to take," he says. "Imagine you've been doing things a certain way for five or 10 years. And all of the sudden some guy comes along and says he thinks there's a better way. But there's no guarantee."

Dr. Stephen Phinney, a professor emeritus at UC Davis, has spent three decades studying low-carb performance. The mainstream consensus has been that you need carbs to do anything other than very moderate intensity exercise. But after a period of adaptation, the body will switch over from carbohydrate to fat as its main fuel for exercise with equal or better performance. That makes an athlete essentially "bonk-proof," says Phinney.  Phinney cited the example of Timothy Olson, who won the 2012 Western States 100, a 100-mile footrace through the High Sierras, in record time on a low-carb, high-fat diet: "He's so skinny it looks like he can take a shower in a shotgun barrel. But even if he's seven or eight percent body fat and only weighs 140 pounds, he still has 25,000 to 30,000 fat calories. If you're about to undertake an event that's going to cost you 14,000 calories, which tank would you like to be hooked into?"

Another benefit of the paleo diet is that it may help extend athletic careers by counteracting the deleterious effects of aging, Phinney says. Typically, below 50 grams of daily carbohydrate intake, the body responds by producing a fuel source from fat called ketone bodies, which also have anti-inflammatory properties that combat oxidative stress.

"As you push performance and training to their limits, you're running up against cumulative oxidative stress that leads to aging," says Phinney. "So if you can use a strategy that counteracts that, it buys you a window of opportunity into longer periods of high-intensity competitive athletics."


LOW CARB. RECIPES WITH A HOLIDAY FLAIR

Shirataki Noodles

This translucent noodle, which is made from the powdered root of the Asian konjac yam, consists mostly of a no-calorie, highly soluble fiber called glucomannan. And that fiber is why shirataki is more than just a pasta imposter. According to a study review by University of Connecticut researchers, glucomannan helps lower bad LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar, and even body weight. What's more, scientists in Thailand found that just 1 gram has the power to significantly slow the absorption of sugar into your bloodstream after you eat a carb-loaded meal.Translation: This noodle can make almost any meal healthier.sample Reduced Carb. recipe COMING:


1.  Spaghetti Squash with Marinara (Pasta Substitute)

  
Ingredients

  • 2 whole spaghetti squash
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Gray salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 cups prepared (jarred) marinara sauce

Directions

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F.

Split the squashes in half and scrape out seeds. Line an oven tray with aluminum foil. Season the spaghetti squash with olive oil, salt, and pepper. Place flesh side down and roast for 30 to 40 minutes until fully cooked. Remove from the oven and let rest until cool enough to handle.

Meanwhile heat the marinara sauce in a large saute pan.

When squash is cool enough to handle, using a large kitchen spoon scrape the strands of squash from the inside of the skin. Toss the spaghetti squash in the pan with the hot marinara for just long enough to get hot. Serve and enjoy.
From The Food Network

SUGGESTED TOPPING OPTIONS FOR SPAGHETTI SQUASH RECIPE

Top with baked or broiled Salmon, other favorite fish, or chicken

Add a salad 



 2.  Quinoa with Roasted Garlic, Tomatoes, and Spinach
 
  Courtesy of Kathy Dinas, event presenter at Calliope

  Cooking Light AUGUST 2010

  Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1/2 cup) (Rinse)

1 whole garlic head

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots

1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper

1/2 cup uncooked quinoa, rinsed and drained

1 tablespoon dry white wine

1 cup fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth

1/2 cup baby spinach leaves

1/3 cup chopped seeded tomato (1 small)

1 tablespoon shaved fresh Parmesan cheese

1/4 teaspoon salt 
 .................

1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. Remove papery skin from garlic head. Cut garlic head in half crosswise, breaking apart to separate whole cloves. Wrap half of

head in foil; reserve remaining garlic for another use. Bake at 350° for 1 hour; cool 10 minutes. Separate cloves; squeeze to

extract garlic pulp. Discard skins.

3. Heat oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add shallots and red pepper to pan; cook 1 minute. Add quinoa to pan; cook 2

minutes, stirring constantly. Add wine; cook until liquid is absorbed, stirring constantly. Add broth; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce

heat, and simmer 15 minutes or until liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat; stir in garlic pulp, spinach, tomato, cheese, and salt.

Serve immediately.

Nutritional Information

Amount per serving

Calories: 130 Fat: 5g Saturated fat: 0.7g Monounsaturated fat: 3.1g Polyunsaturated fat: 1g Protein: 4.1g

Carbohydrate: 16.6g Fiber: 1.8g Cholesterol: 1m g Iron: 1.7m g Sodium : 305m g Calcium : 49m g

Copyright © 2013 Time Inc. Lifestyle Group.  


3.  Turkey Pumpkin Soup
  From:
  
Cathy Berger
  Founder, Fashion Societé  
  www.fashionsociete.com
  347.574.4600 | 516.777.0820

Servings: 12 Servings: 12                                                                        

  • 1 Tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 small yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 fennel bulb, chopped
  • 1 small butternut squash, peeled, seeded and chopped
  • 2 teaspoons fresh ginger, minced
  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 (14oz) can diced tomatoes in sauce
  • 1 (14oz) can pumpkin
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 cup parsley, chopped
  1. In a large soup pot, place the coconut oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 minutes, until tender. Add the fennel, butternut squash and
    ginger. Cook for 5 minutes.
  2. In a large skillet place the ground turkey over medium-high heat. Cook until browned, stirring often. Drain off liquid.
  3. Add the turkey, tomatoes, pumpkin, broth, salt and pepper to the soup pot. Cover and cook over low heat for 40 minutes. Stir in the chopped parsley and cook, uncovered for another 10 minutes. Serve warm. Enjoy!

Nutritional Analysis: One serving equals: 110 calories, 4g fat, 195mg sodium, 10g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, and 9g protein. 


        

4. got milk?                                                                   
 

October 3, 2013 
by Mark Hyman, MD   

Dairy: 6 Reasons You Should Avoid It at All Costs or Why Following the USDA Food Pyramid Guidelines is Bad for Your Health

These days, it seems like almost everybody does. Celebrities, athletes, and even former president Clinton's head of Health and Human Services, Donna Shalala, are all proud to wear the white "milk mustache." After all, everyone knows that you need milk to be healthy ...

Dairy is nature's perfect food -- but only if you're a calf.

If that sounds shocking to you, it's because very few people are willing to tell the truth about dairy. In fact, criticizing milk in America is like taking on motherhood, apple pie, or baseball. But that's just what I'm about to do.

Based on the research and my experience practicing medicine, I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely. I like ice cream just as much as the next person, but as a scientist I have to look honestly at what we know. In today's blog I will explore many of the documented ill-effects of dairy, and give you six reasons you should avoid dairy at all costs.

The Reason I Have Problems with the USDA Food Pyramid

I'm aware that my advice to avoid dairy flies in the face of the new, "up-to-date" food pyramid from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The USDA's pyramid recommends drinking 3 glasses of milk a day. What's wrong with that? Well, for one thing, it's not a recommendation that's based on strict science.  Some of the "experts" who helped create the pyramid actually work for the dairy industry, which makes the US Department of agriculture's recommendations reflect industry interests, not science or our best interests.

In fact, Walter Willet, M.D., Ph.D -- the second-most-cited scientist in all of clinical medicine and the head of nutrition at Harvard's School of Public Health -- is one of the pyramid's most vocal critics. He's even called its guidelines "udderly ridiculous." That's not something a Harvard scientist says lightly.

But Dr. Willett is right. The pyramid just isn't based on key scientific findings about health. In a moment we will take a look at some of the pyramid's recommendations and why I disagree with them.

But before I dissect why the current food pyramid is harmful to your health, I want to offer a bit of hope. I recently attended a medical conference put on by Harvard Medical School and the Culinary Institute of America called Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives and met Eric Rimm, who works closely with Walter Willett at Harvard School of Public Health and is a member of the 2010 USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans Committee.

I asked him if he felt that science not industry would be shaping the new guidelines and he said there was now only one scientist with industry ties on the new panel and he was objective and agreeable to make changes when presented the data. I am anxious to see how the science matches policy but feel a ray of hope that for the first time in the history of our dietary guidelines we will see science predominate, not industry interests and that the language will be direct, clear and simple to understand for all Americans. The guidelines from the early 1990's promoting the consumption of 6-11 servings of bread and cereals daily led to the pasta, carb, sugar generation and led to the largest epidemic of obesity in the history of our species.

Let's hope the new guidelines for 2010 will guide us toward greater health, not an increasing burden of obesity, diabetes and chronic disease. The USDA food policy guidelines form the basis of the school lunch program and it has contributed to a tripling of obesity in children. Let's hope we can serve up a different lunch menu for our children and our nation.

The simple idea that science should become policy is unfortunately one that has found little traction in Washington. But that seems to be shifting a little now.

Now back to why the last government guidelines from 2005 are harmful to your health!

1. Consume a variety of foods within and among the basic food groups while staying within your body's energy needs.

Sounds sensible -- but which food groups? If you choose dairy, meat, fats, and carbohydrates, the "perfect" meal could be a cheeseburger, milkshake, and fries with ketchup (potatoes and tomatoes are the two top vegetables consumed in America). Generic advice like that is pretty meaningless and potentially harmful.

2. Control your caloric intake to manage body weight.

Again, that sounds good, but as I wrote in my book UltraMetabolism, even the best-trained nutritionists and dietitians can't come close to correctly estimating their own caloric intake in a day. Also consider this: Is it okay to consume all of your calories from cola or ice cream as long as you stay within my caloric needs? Of course not. So this is more useless advice.

3. Increase intake of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and nonfat or low-fat milk products.

Well, fruits, veggies, and whole grains are great. Milk -- not so much. I'll get back to that in a minute.

4. Choose carbohydrates wisely.

Who could argue with that? But how do they define "wisely"? The real advice here should be to cut down sugar intake from 185 pounds per person per year (what we currently consume) to less than a pound, avoid flour products (except as a treat), and stick to whole-food carbohydrates like vegetables, fruit, whole grains, beans, nuts, and seeds.

5. Choose to prepare food with little salt.

That's not bad advice. But it doesn't make sense if most of what you eat is packaged or processed foods that you don't actually prepare. For most Americans who eat half of their meals outside their homes, this isn't helpful. A better recommendation would be to avoid packaged, processed, canned, prepared, and fast foods (unless you know exactly how they are made).

6. If you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation.

Sounds good -- but if you're usually drinking two bottles of wine a night, then one seems like moderation! I think a better suggestion is to limit your alcohol consumption to half a drink a day or 3 glasses a week (the amount that seems to have the most health benefit).

7. Don't eat unsafe foods.

Of course you shouldn't leave your egg salad out in the hot sun or toss your salad with hands that just handled raw chicken coated with salmonella. But the food pyramid guidelines don't mention pesticides, hormones, antibiotics, or genetically modified foods, despite scientific evidence of their harm. Shame on the USDA!

You can see now why I have big problems with the food pyramid! Its guidelines try to sound sensible -- while still protecting the interests of the food industry, the agriculture industry, and all of the lobbyists paying for the elections of the Congress. That way everybody's happy ...

But I'm not, and you shouldn't be either. The public just isn't served by this watered down, confusing, and useless pyramid. The next guidelines, I hope will be better, especially with independent scientists like Eric Rimm involved. Worse, some of the recommendations are downright harmful --like the one to drink more milk and dairy products.

The Truth about Dairy

According to Dr. Willett, who has done many studies and reviewed the research on this topic, there are many reasons to pass up milk, including:

1. Milk doesn't reduce fractures.(i) Contrary to popular belief, eating dairy products has never been shown to reduce fracture risk. In fact, according to the Nurses' Health Study dairy may increase risk of fractures by 50 percent!

2. Less dairy, better bones. Countries with lowest rates of dairy and calcium consumption (like those in Africa and Asia) have the lowest rates of osteoporosis.

3. Calcium isn't as bone-protective as we thought.(ii) Studies of calcium supplementation have shown no benefit in reducing fracture risk. Vitamin D appears to be much more important than calcium in preventing fractures.

4. Calcium may raise cancer risk. Research shows that higher intakes of both calcium and dairy products may increase a man's risk of prostate cancer by 30 to 50 percent.(iii) Plus, dairy consumption increases the body's level of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) -- a known cancer promoter.

5. Calcium has benefits that dairy doesn't. Calcium supplements, but not dairy products, may reduce the risk of colon cancer.(iv)

6. Not everyone can stomach dairy.(v) About 75 percent of the world's population is genetically unable to properly digest milk and other dairy products -- a problem called lactose intolerance.

Based on such findings, Dr. Willet has come to some important conclusions:

Everybody needs calcium -- but probably not as much as our government's recommended daily allowance (RDA) and calcium from diet, including greens and beans is better utilized by the body with less risk than calcium supplements.

• Calcium probably doesn't prevent broken bones. Few people in this country are likely to reduce their fracture risk by getting more calcium.

• Men may not want to take calcium supplements. Supplements of calcium and vitamin D may be reasonable for women.

• Dairy may be unhealthy. Advocating dairy consumption may have negative effects on health.  If all that isn't enough to swear you off milk, there are a few other scientific findings worth noting. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently asked the UDSA to look into the scientific basis of the claims made in the "milk mustache" ads. Their panel of scientists stated the truth clearly:

• Milk doesn't benefit sports performance.

• There's no evidence that dairy is good for your bones or prevents osteoporosis -- in fact, the animal protein it contains may help cause bone loss!

• Dairy is linked to prostate cancer.

• It's full of saturated fat and is linked to heart disease.

• Dairy causes digestive problems for the 75 percent of people with lactose intolerance.

• Dairy aggravates irritable bowel syndrome.

Simply put, the FTC asked the dairy industry, "Got Proof?" -- and the answer was NO!

Plus, dairy may contribute to even more health problems, like:

Allergies (vi)
• Sinus problems
• Ear infections
• Type 1 diabetes (
vii)
• Chronic constipation (
viii)
• Anemia (in children)

Due to these concerns, many have begun to consider raw milk an alternative. But that isn't really a healthy form of dairy either ...

Yes, raw, whole, organic milk eliminates concerns like pesticides, hormones, antibiotics, and the effects of homogenization and pasteurization -- but to me, these benefits don't outweigh dairy's potential risks.  From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn't domesticate animals and weren't able to drink milk (unless some brave hunter-gather milked a wild tiger or buffalo!).

If you don't believe that, consider this: The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase - the enzyme needed to properly metabolize lactose, the sugar in milk -- sometime between the ages of two and five. In fact, for most mammals, the normal condition is to stop producing the enzymes needed to properly digest and metabolize milk after they have been weaned.

Our bodies just weren't made to digest milk on a regular basis. Instead, most scientists agree that it's better for us to get calcium, potassium, protein, and fats from other food sources, like whole plant foods -- vegetables, fruits, beans, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and seaweed.

So here is my advice for dealing with dairy.

6 Tips for Dealing with Dairy

Take your Cow for a Walk. It will do you much more good than drinking milk.

• Don't rely on dairy for healthy bones. If you want healthy bones, get plenty of exercise and supplement with 2,000 IU of vitamin D daily.

• Get your calcium from food. These include dark green leafy vegetables, sesame tahini, sea vegetables, and sardines or salmon with the bones.

• Try giving up all dairy. That means eliminate milk, cheese, yogurt, and ice cream for two weeks and see if you feel better. You should notice improvements with your sinuses, post-nasal drip, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, energy, and weight. Then start eating dairy again and see how you feel. If you feel worse, you should try to give it up for life.

• If you can tolerate dairy, use only raw, organic dairy products. I suggest focusing on fermented products like unsweetened yogurt and kefir, occasionally.

• If you have to feed your child formula from milk, don't worry. The milk in infant formula is hydrolyzed or broken down and easier to digest (although it can still cause allergies). Once your child is a year old, switch him or her to real food and almond milk.

Still got milk? I hope not! Remember, dairy is not crucial for good health. I encourage you to go dairy-free and see what it does for you.

Mark Hyman, MD

 
5.. the eyes don't have it-nine essential shoe tips for men & women for 2014     
  by Cathy Berger, Fashion Societe

Why since the dawn of time is there so much fascination about footwear? After all, shoes simply provide protection from the dirty mean streets of the world, right?
A "good pair" will outlast most clothing. But does a pair of shoes get noticed before a pair of eyes? Eyes are windows to the soul but shoes, they say, Make The Man - and women are, admittedly, addicted.

For anyone female or male, young or old, rich or poor, who is looking to sartorially reveal something about themselves, shoes are a most popular indicator. The wrong ones invoke hushed snide remarks. The right ones invoke stares and envy. Articles abound that proclaim to reveal what shoe choices really mean about the wearer.

So Ladies first - here are five points for successful shoe looks at work and play:

1. High heeled pointy shoes are all the rage. Studded, colorblocked, ankle-strapped, D'Orsay- we encourage you to peruse with pleasure. Problem is, this trend is hell on toes. If you can't/won't wear them because of discomfort, there is an option: Companies like Nike have paired with Cole Haan to offer sleek looks that offer delightfully comfortable toe boxes. This allows breathing space at the point via an ever so slightly round or square "cut off" that still has that desired sex appeal like the pointy toe sports.

2. Know how high a heel you truly can pull off . Face it, not everyone is meant to walk around in five inch stilettos! While sky high heels do look great and make legs look long and beautiful, so do certain lower heels when cut low on the vamp and high on the back of the heel. This gives the illusion of a deeper decline. If you still can’t balance yourself properly with a heel, then try a platform shoe which conceals the elevated area underneath the ball of the feet.

3. Ever leave the fun behind because "my shoes are killing me"? Proper fit is key to happy feet and a good attitude. Make sure your shoes hug the sides and length of your feet regardless of the "size". Space = Sliding and sliding creates nasty, painful blisters. Dr. Scholls and others sell padding options that close gaps and ease pressure -- use them!

4. Treat yourself to a stylish pair of flats which have been and will remain so on-trend in 2014. Carla Bruni looks hot in them standing next to her husband, former French President Nicolas Sarkozy. For us mere mortals, choose something pretty in a neutral color with a little sparkle for an easy go-to, run- around shoe. And a word to our fellow party-lovers: always keep a pair on standby for those nights when you know your feet will need a break from heels.

5. Take care of your shoes. Clean them, polish them. If they are becoming worn-looking, take thee to the shoemaker and have them repaired with new taps or soles.  [This goes for men too, who also should make sure laces are in good shape and not frayed.]

We find men often have more questions about what pant length should be worn with their shoes, rather than what shoe styles are essential. So Men -- here are 4 pointers to guide the right overall look from your knees down:

1. Jeans – look best when worn with boots or sneakers or casual loafers. The hem should cover the back heel and you should not be able to see the socks (if worn at all).

2. Chinos – best worn with edgy (not gym) sneakers and should hang quite long over your shoe.

3. Cuffed [Suit] Pants – should be worn with classic, clean line shoes, nothing casual or thick-soled. Wear with a sharp crease down the front; let them cover and sit on top of the shoe.

4. Un-cuffed Suit Pants – can be worn with classic, somewhat casual yet current shoes and the hem should come down a little further than with cuffed suit pants and allow for a small break.

With a new year ahead, what better time to "get it right" by starting at the bottom and working your way up! Style and comfort is our fav blend for 2014. Just don't forget to think of something as you walk that makes your eyes sparkle as well. ~

  
 6. building a strong core:  to crunch or not to crunch                     


by Rhonda Carol, MFA, Calliope Director, Master Fitness Trainer/Fitness Design Expert, Pilates Instructor, Wellness Coach

My clients often ask me what exercises are most beneficial for building a strong core and what type of program is recommended for weight reduction and a reduced mid-section.  What about crunches?  Are they beneficial? 
 
The abdominal core muscles are much more than the popular 'six-pack'.   The core includes the back, pelvic, side, and buttock muscles that serve as a the support for spinal and pelvic stability and enable us to perform basic movements, exercise functions and sports activities.  The core is the connecting hub between 
the upper and lower body and a compromised or weak core affects the function of the entire body.   Core strength is vital to the health and function of the
back and
should be a part of every exercise regimen.

To crunch or not to crunch?  
According to the ISSA "Crunches are a terrific abdominal exercise for core strength and for spinal integrity".  It is important to follow a core strengthening routine for the sake of maintaining physical health, stability and well being rather than simply for the sake of appearances (and perhaps a six-pack).  The effectiveness of abdominal crunches has been called into question over the years due to the use of heavy resistance equipment including  weights and machines which some professionals and clients fear might increase waiste size.    Doing ab crunches without heavy resistance 2 or 3 times per week is not likely to increase waist size.  I would recommend the use of one's own body weight, light resistance and Pilates core conditioning that utilizes a variety of abdominal exercises in addition to crunches.     Abdominal training alone will not reduce body fat.   Our ability to burn fat is increased with the growth of  overall muscle tissue via hypertrophic (weight training) exercise.  It is important to note that diet and aerobic activity are  important factors in maintaining a healthy weight and waist size. 

Work the Rectus Abdominus correctly
According to research at the University of Nebraska Medical Center monitoring muscle activity while performing crunches, testers who performed the 'navel to spine' format of sucking in the abs before performing curls doubled the amount of activity in the muscle as compared to those that did not, and participants were working their muscles more efficiently to include the rectus abdominus as well as the obliques (sides).  It is important to avoid pulling on the head or engaging in rapid, uncontrolled movements which can create a strain on the back and neck.  Abdominal exercises focusing on precise alignment, navel-to-spine Pilates Core work and positioning are a wonderful choice because the back is stabilized and the focus on proper breathing teaches us to suck our stomachs while working towards a deepened muscle contraction. 
 
Core Muscles
Rectus Abdominis
Erector Spinae
External Obliques
Internal Obliques
Transverse Abdominis (TVA)
Multifidus
Gluteus medius and minimus
Gluteus maximus, hamstring, piriformis
Hip Flexors - include: psoas major, illiacus, rectus femoris, pectineus, sartorius
Hip adductors

Some effective abdominal  exercises
(Please be careful to follow suggested adjustments for those with back problems when doing these exercises)

The Bicycle
Ball Crunches
Verticle Leg Crunch
The Plank
Reverse Crunches
Overhead Arm Curl
The Hundred
The Teaser

What about weight reduction?

A combination of diet, weight training for increased muscle strength and size (increases the body's ability to burn fat) and aerobic activity are the best ingredients for maintaining a healthy body weight.  Reduce fructose in the diet, increase healthy fat consumption (nuts, olive oil, avocado) avoid processes foods, reduce carbohydrates, and maintain a diet that is high in fresh vegetables, fruits, berries, nuts and natural protein sources such as fish ( Wild Salmon and other low-mercury fish) drink plenty of water and choose organic if possible.


 

7.  the health benefits of drumming
                                             

BBC

10 February 2009
by Jane Elliot

"Could a natural rhythm - which some experts believe we all possess - be a cure for a variety of health problems?

Some certainly think so. Musician Simon Lee, from Kent, is called on to teach drumming to patients with problems ranging from addiction to autism, and learning difficulties to mental health issues. He has even offered help to terminally ill patients needing palliative care. And he says the results are amazing. Experts believe
that rhythmic drumming can aid health by inducing a deep sense of relaxation, reducing stress, and lowering blood pressure. 

Drumming health benefits
"Drumming has a number of benefits, It can energise or relax. It can foster a sense of playfulness or release anger and tension. It can also help in the conquering of social isolation and the building of positive relationships." One patient, an alcoholic, told Simon her drumming sessions had helped her so much it had given her the inspiration to continue with a gruelling detox course. 

There is strong evidence to suggest that drumming may actually be a healing activity
S. Lee


There is strong evidence to suggest that
drumming may actually be a healing activity," he said. 
Some have gone so far as to prove that time spent drumming can positively affect our immune systems, levels of stress and psychological well being."

Natural sense of rhythm

Stephen Clift, professor of health education at Canterbury University and director of research at the Sidney De Haan Research Centre for Arts and Health, Folkestone, said his centre had recently hosted a workshop into the benefits of drumming. It gives a general sense of well being," he said,  drumming may help people relax 

"As a research centre we are interested in arts and health generally but particularly in regards to music.   Most of the work we have been doing is in regards to singing, particularly in groups and community sessions - but these benefits apply to drumming."It is fun and challenging, but can produce very positive results very quickly."

Dr Barry Bittman, a neurologist, and CEO of the Yamaha and Wellness Institute in Pensylvania, believes one of the great potential benefits of employing drums in therapy is that they are so easy use.  And although some might disagree, he believes that everybody has a sense of rhythm. "I believe we are hard wired for music there is evidence that even in the womb the foetus has rhythm," he said.

"We are all naturally musical, although in the US less than 7% of adults over the age of 18 even pick up a musical instrument once a year.  "Drums are accessible and don't present the challenge of a learning curve - anyone regardless of handicap can sit and beat out a rhythm on a drum.

"Drumming is affordable, accessible and sustainable.  "I think we all begin as drummers if you think about childhood the children are under the table banging on pots and pans."